The Work of Greg Clark and Jimmie Frise

Category: Illustration Page 1 of 6

War in the Parlor

November 18, 1939

During the wars, soldiers on leave could be invited to people’s homes for a meal and entertainment. This illustration came with a story by Gwenyth Barrington, who recalled being a child in WW1 when soldiers would come to her home in groups of 6 to 10. In the article, she provides suggestions for “puzzle parties” that could be used for entertainment. The joke in the comic is that grown men would not like to play the children’s game “Button, button“, as suggested by the well meaning old ladies.

Halloween Masks

October 1, 1938

BOYS AND GIRLS! JOIN IN THE FUN!

No. 4 Gregory Clark

Here’s a mask of Gregory Clark waiting for you to cut out and wear as a false face

It’s a Cinch to Make This Mask

ARE you going to a Hallowe’en party? The Star Weekly comic masks are made to order to liven up that spooky night’s fun. If you start right now and cut out Gregory Clark, you’ll have five different masks to wear, for next week you’ll have Wimpy, then Maggie, then Jimmie Frise, then Jiggs. That’ll bring you right up to Hallowe’en when you’ll be looking around for a funny disguise to wear. And if you want more, you can get back issues of The Star Weekly for masks of Popeye, Old Archie and Olive Oyl. Just wear them and you’ll find they’ll bring you more fun than a bushel of monkeys whether you’re going to a Halloween party or not.

Cut out this illustration of GREG CLARK in a square, leaving about an inch border all the way around. Get a sheet of paper about 15 inches square. Any good heavy wrapping paper or light-weight cardboard will do. Paste the illustration, on the paper. When dry, cut the outer edges of the mask but be sure to follow the line around the square flaps indicated at each of GREG CLARK’S ears. Use a razor blade or a sharply pointed knife to cut around his nose, eyes and chin on the dotted black line. Next, fold down the flap along his ears. Get two medium sized rubber bands. Place one side of the rubber band inside the fold of the flap and paste down firmly. Do not attempt to use the mask until the flap is dry and firm. Now, placing the rubber bands around your ears, march over to a mirror and there you are, GREGORY CLARK himself.

October 22, 1938

HEY, KIDS Look who’s here!

It’s JIMMIE FRISE

your seventh STAR WEEKLY FALSE FACE

Be ready for Hallowe’en with this mask of Jimmie

YOU’LL FIND THE STAR WEEKLY COMIC MASKS MORE FUN THAN A BARREL OF MONKEYS FOR A “SHELL-OUT” OR HOUSE PARTY THIS HALLOWEEN. SO BRING OUT YOUR PASTE POT AND SCISSORS RIGHT AWAY AND JOIN IN THE FUN.

Cut out this illustration of JIMMIE FRISE in a square, leaving about an inch border all the way around. Get a sheet of light weight cardboard about 15 inches square. Paste the illustration on the cardboard. When dry, cut the outer edges of the mask but be sure to follow the line around the square flaps indicated at each of JIMMIE’S ears. Use a razor blade or a sharply pointed knife to cut through the inner pink circle of his eyes. Smaller children can use the mask if they cut out the portion of the white circle nearest JIMMIE’S nose. Next, fold down the flaps along his ears. Get two medium sized rubber bands. Place one side of the rubber band inside the fold of the flap and paste down firmly. Do not attempt to use the mark until the flap is dry and firm. Now, placing the rubber bands around your ears, march over to a mirror and there you are, JIMMIE FRISE himself.


Editor’s Notes: In October 1938, the Toronto Star Weekly printed Halloween masks based on comic strip characters that kids could cut out and use. Note that “trick or treating” was not as common at the time, (referred to as “shell out” above), so it was suggested they could be worn to a party. I like that Greg characteristically has his hat at a jaunty angle, and Jimmie is portrayed with his ever present cigarette in his mouth.

Modern readers would likely know Popeye, Olive Oyl, and Wimpy from Thimble Theatre by E.C. Segar (who died on October 13, 1938, around when these were published). Jiggs and Maggie were from Bringing Up Father by George McManus. And of course Old Archie was Jimmie Frise’s own from Birdseye Center.

Angels Defend Us

October 24, 1931

These illustrations came with an article on militias and civil unrest in Canada during the Great Depression. The article specifically touched on the role of the militia in those situation, given the riot that occurred in Estevan Saskatchewan the previous month. It emphasized the poor state of the militia due to funding, and how the members of militia were “angels”, willing to do so much and provided so little. The pretty woman in the photo holding the gun had nothing to do with it, she was just added to draw attention to the story.

October 24, 1931

Fire Fighting de Luxe

October 12, 1929

This is another excellent image by Jim to accompany a Merrill Denison story about women who turned fighting a bush fire into an enjoyable experience by making it into a kind of picnic.

Radio Goes Roady

September 9, 1933

This nice illustration by Jim accompanied an article by Ely Waters about cars with radios in them. Since radios back then had vacuum tubes, they could be very expensive. The first commercial car radio debuted in 1930 for $130 (almost $2000 in 2021), which could be 25% the price of a car.

I love this line from the story: “If you have a son who drives like a lunatic and every time the telephone rings after eleven p.m. you are afraid to answer it because it might be the hospital or the morgue, give him a car radio. It will cut his speed in two.”

“Mister Toronto”

August 28, 1926

This is quite the tongue in cheek article by Mary Lowrey Ross, making fun of beauty pageants by reversing the gender roles. Jim illustrates this excellently with the men being paraded in bathing suits in front of women judges, and the spectator shouting out that “he is too cute for words,” along with the loving embrace with his father. Unfortunately, I cannot find out much about Mrs. Ross (she was married to W. W. E. Ross, a geophysicist and poet). His Wikipedia entry just says “on June 3, 1924, he married Mary Evelyn Lowrey, the well-known journalist.” She was born in 1891 in Brantford Ontario and died in 1984 in Brighton Ontario. She wrote for other publications like Maclean’s and Saturday Night. The Maclean’s article linked is also from 1926, and includes a photo of her reproduced below. A Google search will return a number of her articles.

Mary Lowery Ross

The Dog’s Hotel – “Pets Parked Here”

August 4, 1923

Jim illustrated this story about a “hotel” kennel for dogs for the summer while the family is on vacation.

Country in the City

July 17, 1935

This is another illustration Jim did for a news article by our old friend, Merrill Denison, former Star Weekly regular, after he moved to New York. It was an article about nature and farms that were still within New York City limits at the time.

Even a Street Car Strike in Toronto Has Its Compensations

June 28, 1919

A Jitney is a vehicle for hire which falls between a taxicab and a bus. You can see a photo of a truck carrying passengers during the streetcar strike of 1919 here.

Letter to the Old Typewriter

May 14, 1932

These illustrations by Jim appeared alongside a story by Gordon Sinclair, who was well known for his globe-trotting reporting. The story was a tongue-in-cheek obituary for his old portable typewriter “Tip” that he carried on his adventures that had bit the dust.

May 14, 1932

Page 1 of 6

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén