The Work of Greg Clark and Jimmie Frise

Tag: 1929 Page 1 of 2

Fire Fighting de Luxe

October 12, 1929

This is another excellent image by Jim to accompany a Merrill Denison story about women who turned fighting a bush fire into an enjoyable experience by making it into a kind of picnic.

That Patch of Golden Rod on the West Hill

September 14, 1929

This comic was badly muddled on the right in the microfilm by tape that was placed on the original that had yellowed.

British American Oil Ad – 05/25/29

May 25, 1929

Jim created this advertisement for the British American Oil Company, which became Gulf Canada in 1969. In 1985, it’s assets were sold to Petro-Canada and Ultramar. Other advertisements from the series can be seen here, and here.

“O Pshaw!”

April 13, 1929

They are trying to sniff out a fugitive in the woods.

Christmas at Glenlivit

December 21, 1929

These illustrations by Jim accompanied an article by Ephraim Acres (the pen name of Hugh Templin). He wrote many stories about “Glenlivit”, a fictional small town, for the Star Weekly in the late 1920s and early 1930s. “Glenlivit” was also a pseudonym for the town of Fergus Ontario, where he was the newspaper editor of the Fergus New Record. According to the article linked, he even explored the idea of a comic strip with Frise based on his writings.

December 21, 1929
December 21, 1929

Another False Alarm!

December 7, 1929

The Disturber of the Peace

August 24, 1929

Business is Picking Up!

June 15, 1929

British American Oil Ad – 04/27/29

April 27, 1929

Jim created this advertisement for the British American Oil Company, which became Gulf Canada in 1969. In 1985, it’s assets were sold to Petro-Canada and Ultramar. Another advertisement from the series can be seen here.

"What's the Market?"

March 16, 1929

These illustrations were made by Jim for a story by Caesar Smith, a regular contributor to the Star Weekly in the late 1920s and early 1930s. The story outlined the public interest in investing and making money in the stock market. However, we in the future know that this did not end well with the stock market crash seven months later that heralded the Great Depression.

March 16, 1929

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