October 1, 1938

BOYS AND GIRLS! JOIN IN THE FUN!

No. 4 Gregory Clark

Here’s a mask of Gregory Clark waiting for you to cut out and wear as a false face

It’s a Cinch to Make This Mask

ARE you going to a Hallowe’en party? The Star Weekly comic masks are made to order to liven up that spooky night’s fun. If you start right now and cut out Gregory Clark, you’ll have five different masks to wear, for next week you’ll have Wimpy, then Maggie, then Jimmie Frise, then Jiggs. That’ll bring you right up to Hallowe’en when you’ll be looking around for a funny disguise to wear. And if you want more, you can get back issues of The Star Weekly for masks of Popeye, Old Archie and Olive Oyl. Just wear them and you’ll find they’ll bring you more fun than a bushel of monkeys whether you’re going to a Halloween party or not.

Cut out this illustration of GREG CLARK in a square, leaving about an inch border all the way around. Get a sheet of paper about 15 inches square. Any good heavy wrapping paper or light-weight cardboard will do. Paste the illustration, on the paper. When dry, cut the outer edges of the mask but be sure to follow the line around the square flaps indicated at each of GREG CLARK’S ears. Use a razor blade or a sharply pointed knife to cut around his nose, eyes and chin on the dotted black line. Next, fold down the flap along his ears. Get two medium sized rubber bands. Place one side of the rubber band inside the fold of the flap and paste down firmly. Do not attempt to use the mask until the flap is dry and firm. Now, placing the rubber bands around your ears, march over to a mirror and there you are, GREGORY CLARK himself.

October 22, 1938

HEY, KIDS Look who’s here!

It’s JIMMIE FRISE

your seventh STAR WEEKLY FALSE FACE

Be ready for Hallowe’en with this mask of Jimmie

YOU’LL FIND THE STAR WEEKLY COMIC MASKS MORE FUN THAN A BARREL OF MONKEYS FOR A “SHELL-OUT” OR HOUSE PARTY THIS HALLOWEEN. SO BRING OUT YOUR PASTE POT AND SCISSORS RIGHT AWAY AND JOIN IN THE FUN.

Cut out this illustration of JIMMIE FRISE in a square, leaving about an inch border all the way around. Get a sheet of light weight cardboard about 15 inches square. Paste the illustration on the cardboard. When dry, cut the outer edges of the mask but be sure to follow the line around the square flaps indicated at each of JIMMIE’S ears. Use a razor blade or a sharply pointed knife to cut through the inner pink circle of his eyes. Smaller children can use the mask if they cut out the portion of the white circle nearest JIMMIE’S nose. Next, fold down the flaps along his ears. Get two medium sized rubber bands. Place one side of the rubber band inside the fold of the flap and paste down firmly. Do not attempt to use the mark until the flap is dry and firm. Now, placing the rubber bands around your ears, march over to a mirror and there you are, JIMMIE FRISE himself.


Editor’s Notes: In October 1938, the Toronto Star Weekly printed Halloween masks based on comic strip characters that kids could cut out and use. Note that “trick or treating” was not as common at the time, (referred to as “shell out” above), so it was suggested they could be worn to a party. I like that Greg characteristically has his hat at a jaunty angle, and Jimmie is portrayed with his ever present cigarette in his mouth.

Modern readers would likely know Popeye, Olive Oyl, and Wimpy from Thimble Theatre by E.C. Segar (who died on October 13, 1938, around when these were published). Jiggs and Maggie were from Bringing Up Father by George McManus. And of course Old Archie was Jimmie Frise’s own from Birdseye Center.